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Auburn man who toured with Black Sabbath dies after auto accident

Auburn man who toured with Black Sabbath dies after auto accident
Peter Restey, an Auburn native who toured the world as a technician with Black Sabbath, Manowar and other musical acts, passed away June 10. He was 62. According to a death notice submitted by Langham Funeral Home, Restey passed away at Upstate University Hospital as a result of injuries sustained in a June 4 auto accident. The Citizen: Read More more

Local group presents historic artifact to Washington, D.C. museum

Local group presents historic artifact to Washington, D.C. museum
A cap from the 1800s has been presented to a Washington, D.C. museum group from the Owasco Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution. The DAR, a women’s service organization, presented the cap Saturday to David Price, executive director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Clara Barton Missing Solider Office Museum, and Pry House Field... more

Remembering the Labelon era in Canandaigua

Remembering the Labelon era in Canandaigua
After the Miller Corset Factory, the Canandaigua Velocipede Company and the E.C. Brown Company occupied the building at 10 Chapin St. from 1921 to 1959, the Labelon Corporation of Rochester purchased it and began to relocate its operations to the facility in 1960. E. Billings Brewster, president of Labelon, called the Canandaigua location "ideal for us," and explained that the... more

Port Byron native finds ‘priceless’ Babe Ruth card

Port Byron native finds ‘priceless’ Babe Ruth card
The keen eye of a Port Byron native has made him the proud owner of a priceless baseball card. Experts say it is the only one of its kind and it was purchased for only $2. Dale Ball, who grew up in Port Byron, is an avid card collector. He found the card on the west coast. “The world seems... more

East Williamson fire hall on the hunt for its past

East Williamson fire hall on the hunt for its past
The East Williamson Fire Hall was originally a school house in the 1800s, before becoming the fire house in 1947. “If you lose sense of where you come from, you don’t know where to go in the future,” said Gary Dick, East Williamson Fire Department historian. During renovations, an old bell that once sat on top of the building was... more

‘They sacrificed everything’: Memorial Day in Canandaigua

‘They sacrificed everything’: Memorial Day in Canandaigua
Three-year-old Billy Clark sat curbside on the Memorial day parade route, savoring the giant tootsie pop jammed inside his right cheek. It was clear his favorite part of the day was “catching candy.” Likewise his buddy and fellow treat scavenger, 5-year-old Luke LaChapelle. “I liked catching lots of candy and the music and flags, and seeing my soccer team,” said... more

Yates County: From glaciers to Native American habitation

Yates County: From glaciers to Native American habitation
From Glaciers to Native American Habitation, Yates County has a rich geological and historical story. From the time of the glaciers and when they retreated until the revolutionary war, Native American cultures lived between and around the shores of Keuka, Seneca and Canandaigua Lakes. From the nomadic archaic people that lived here after the ice age to the mound building... more

Cheshire marks a day of remembering the fallen

Cheshire marks a day of remembering the fallen
It’s always the right time to remember the fallen. That was clear Saturday when Cheshire residents refused to let pouring rain dampen their gratitude for those who served and died for their country. The 2019 Cheshire Memorial Day Commemoration and Community Picnic was hosted Saturday by the Cheshire Community Action Team in partnership with the Cheshire Volunteer Fire Department. The... more

Austin Steward marker unveiling calls attention to West Avenue Cemetery

Austin Steward marker unveiling calls attention to West Avenue Cemetery
The unveiling of a marker to remember a forgotten hero of the movement to abolish slavery has called attention to his resting place in the West Avenue Cemetery — a place of history that city officials say is in need of upkeep. Austin Steward, a former slave, Rochester business owner and author of the book, “Twenty-two Years a Slave and... more

The story of Jacob Hodges in Ontario County

The story of Jacob Hodges in Ontario County
As far as jailhouse reformations go, the one for Jacob Hodges worked, although not everyone was sold on his change from accused murderer to God-fearing man of the church. Hodges, an African-American ex-convict who served jail time for his role in the murder of a man over a plot of land, when he died in 1842 was a member in... more

Feminists to visit Seneca Falls to celebrate centennial of women’s suffrage

Feminists to visit Seneca Falls to celebrate centennial of women’s suffrage
Talk about plenty of advance notice. Feminists from across the nation are invited to visit the Birthplace of the Women’s Rights Movement Jan. 17-19, 2020, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in America. The gathering coincides with the fourth annual Women March in Seneca Falls. On that January weekend, activists with Women March in Seneca Falls will conduct... more

Auburn welcome center subject of piece in architecture publication

Auburn welcome center subject of piece in architecture publication
The New York State Equal Rights Heritage Center in Auburn is the subject of an April piece in Metropolis, a New York City-based architecture and design magazine. The piece focuses on the center’s design by nARCHITECTS, of Brooklyn. Eric Bunge, one of the principals at the firm, shared with Metropolis how that design evolved from a regional visitor center to... more

Artists wanted for Seneca Falls bridge mural project

Artists wanted for Seneca Falls bridge mural project
With Town Board approval, the Rev. Leah Ntuala is now looking for local artists who would like to paint public murals on the Rumsey Street Bridge along the Ludovico Sculpture Trail. Starting Wednesday and through May 28, she will accept submissions from artists for ideas. Actual painting of approved murals will begin the first week of June. “Currently, these bridge... more

Speak to the Light: Two Centuries of Women’s History in the Finger Lakes

Speak to the Light: Two Centuries of Women’s History in the Finger Lakes
To commemorate the 200th Anniversary of the death of Jemima Wilkinson, The Yates County History Center is hosting Speak to the Light: Two Centuries of Women’s History in the Finger Lakes June 28–29 in Penn Yan. Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner, who will give a Keynote speech Friday evening about her anthology, “Women’s Suffrage.” One of the first American women to... more

City of Geneva pays tribute to John Greco

City of Geneva pays tribute to John Greco
John Greco loved his hometown and his work with City Council, where he served for close to 25 years. But those who know him say he loved his family even more. On Wednesday night, his loved ones attended the City Council meeting to hear Mayor Ron Alcock pay homage to his friend and fellow council member on behalf of the... more

New Auburn museum exhibit highlights local medical history

New Auburn museum exhibit highlights local medical history
Kirsten Wise is confident the Cayuga Museum of History & Art’s newest permanent exhibit is something everyone can connect to. “Pioneer Physicians: The Infancy of Modern Medicine,” is relatable because “everyone has been to a doctor at some point in their life,” said Wise, the museum’s executive director. The exhibit touches on topics like how people became doctors in the... more

LETTER: It Never Ends

LETTER: It Never Ends
Town Supervisor Greg Lazzaro’s resolution to cease funding the National Women’s Hall of Fame is nothing short of an appalling example of exactly why entities like the Women’s Hall of Fame are absolutely critical to our society decades after the Women’s Rights Movement of the 1960’s and 1970’s. The Hall of Fame recognizes the accomplishments of numerous, often otherwise-ignored women... more

Milestones and memories celebrated in Canandaigua

Milestones and memories celebrated in Canandaigua
It was 1919 when Congress gave women the right to vote. Woodrow Wilson was president, World War I came to a close, and movies were silent. Rotary dial phones were a new invention, as was the pop-up toaster that used heated electrical coils. That year, on another continent, Christine McDonald was born on Jan. 1, a New Year’s baby in... more
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